lauren splats… almost

so much for not blogging…

i got hit by a car tonight on my way to the gym. i was riding my bike on the sidewalk (i’m told this is not illegal and much safer than riding on the road), going against traffic (again, i’m told this is safer), when i came to an intersection. i slowed down, noted the stopped car, checked the green light and the pedestrian crossing, and continued forward into the intersection. i saw the stopped car start into a right turn, realized what was about to happen, swerved, and CRASH. they clipped my back tire, knocking me over, but i caught myself and the bike. i have a few minor cuts and bruises, but nothing major. sadly, my bike will need a little TLC before i’ll be able to ride again (slight problem when it’s your primary means of transportation), but still nothing major. the lexus that hit me will have to get a new bumper, though… yikes. i didn’t get the driver’s contact information since 10% of me was scared i didn’t have the right of way. i can’t afford a lexus bumper. the couple that hit me was more concerned about my ability to walk than anything. i think the little lady in the passenger seat was more shaken up than i was.

anywho… my dad thinks i should get a car.

Advertisements
Tagged , ,

One thought on “lauren splats… almost

  1. Wow, sorry to hear this. I’ve been there — only I was the driver. About a year ago, I was involved in an almost identical incident where I hit a guy on a bicycle. He, too, was on the sidewalk going against traffic. Since Florida is a comparative negligence state with regard to torts, he was technically as much at fault as I was. That, however, didn’t make me feel any better. He wasn’t hurt, but his bike was. So I immediately took him to get a new bike since that was his only mode of transportation — much like your situation again. I think the driver should have offered to have your bike fixed at the very least since most states will presume that the driver of a motor vehicle has a greater duty of care that one on a bike merely due to a motor vehicle’s potential for causing harm (the “dangerous instrumentality” doctrine).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: